Neither lemon nor orange: know the fruits and vegetables that have the most vitamin C |  Health |  Magazine

Neither lemon nor orange: know the fruits and vegetables that have the most vitamin C | Health | Magazine

The chemical name of vitamin C is ascorbic acid and it is involved in many vital processes and functions. Two medium oranges provide between 100 and 150 mg of this substance, and the amount provided by the lemon is almost equal.

The almost absolute presence of ascorbic acid in the plant world disproves one of the great myths of Western breakfast: that orange juice is the best source of vitamin C to start the day, as there are others that perform the same function and have more intake of this vitamin.

In a balanced diet, vitamin C consumption is between 40 and 100 milligrams (mg) per day from many other plant-based sources, according to the National Institutes of Health.

To give you an idea of ​​what are some of the fruits and vegetables that can meet your daily vitamin C requirement, take a note below of these natural foods that contain more ascorbic acid per 100 grams than oranges and provide about 50 milligrams for each. 100 grams, as reported by El Diario.

Ten fruits and vegetables that contain more vitamin C than oranges

No one doubts that vitamin C is essential for the proper functioning of human physiological processes. Photo: Pexel

Fruits and vegetables that contain more vitamin C than oranges

Red peppers contain 139 mg of ascorbic acid per 100 grams of product, as long as they are eaten raw, as heat destroys much of the vitamin C.

This spicy herb has 133 mg of ascorbic acid per 100 grams. It can be added to salads or prepared in couscous with a squeeze of lemon.

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It has 110 mg of ascorbic acid per 100 grams, as long as it is eaten raw. It can be added to cold soups, in salads or as a crudite to cover sauces, hummus or baba ganoush.

Broccoli must be eaten raw to take advantage of all its vitamins. Photo: Victor Alvarez

It has 100 mg of ascorbic acid per 100 grams; It can be a great breakfast substitute for orange juice. Furthermore, its high percentage of fibers gives it laxative power.

It has 93 mg of ascorbic acid per 100 grams. It is usually used in julienned salads, although due to its slightly sweet flavor it is sometimes presented on a separate plate sprinkled with orange juice.

Despite their high sugar content, their 90 mg of ascorbic acid per 100 grams and their vegetable fiber make them attractive as a source of vitamin C.

Basil: widely used in cooking for its great aroma, it is antifungal, bactericidal and anti-inflammatory.

They offer 70 mg of ascorbic acid per 100 grams of product. They are another mouthwatering substitute for morning juice or an ideal dessert, yes: no added sugar.

Its 61 mg of ascorbic acid per 100 grams makes it a good addition to salads, albeit in moderation, as its flavor is strong and not everyone likes it.

Taking advantage of persimmon or rosewood season, remember that they give away 60 mg of ascorbic acid per 100 grams, so it’s a good idea to take advantage of this and buy them from the greengrocer.

Being a fruit more or less present in the markets, it is worth highlighting its 60 mg of ascorbic acid per 100 grams. (I)